Brand

Business: A Story of Humans

Business: A Story of Humans

For the past several years, I haven’t gone a single month without saying something along the lines of “Your customers aren’t buying from a business, they’re buying from you.”

This sentiment that I often share with clients, prospects, and colleagues is all too often lost in the modern-day world. For the vast majority of our clients, they fall in the small or medium-sized business bucket. These are individuals who are going out there each and every day, sharing their experiences, telling their story, and connecting with others on a more intimate level.

Review Management 101

Review Management 101

This past week, two of our clients received negative reviews on their Google listings. The first is an on-again/off-again client whose website we designed, whereas with the second, we’re actively helping them generate a positive digital reputation.

Although this was a little bit of a surprise, on the other hand, I somewhat expected this. The reason for that has nothing to do with the clients themselves. They’re both very good at what they do (which makes our job easier).

In fact, it actually comes down to the simple realization that statistically you just can’t please everyone. With the first client, I know that he had worked his tail off to help this customer have a positive experience, despite the fact that his customer was hard to reach. Meanwhile, the second client is dealing with something far more severe: Pure defamation.

Why go into such explicit detail over a couple bad reviews?

Because reviews are ultimately the lifeblood for small and medium-sized businesses. A couple bad reviews on any of the major platforms, such as Facebook, Google, or Yelp, could lead to countless missed opportunities in the marketplace.

Regardless of whether you’re dealing with a frustrating client, defamation, or simple miscommunication, there is a definitive “right way” and a “wrong way” to response management.

Building a Brand

Building a Brand

When I was in college, one of the first marketing concepts I learned was about the power of a brand. “A brand is a promise,” my professor would say. “It’s a promise to your customers to uphold certain values that represent how you want to do business and be seen by the rest of the world.”

These values can range from creating the expectation of excellent customer service to following a code of ethics with each transaction. The important thing is that those values are consistent throughout a business’ life.